Friday, April 18, 2014

Public Education - a tiered subscription model

<snark>

I think I've solved the teacher pay problem. I think I've found the solution to the teacher respect issue. I think I'll receive a medal for this...

I think public schools should operate on a tiered subscription model.

Here's what I'm thinking:



Free public education

  • ad supported
    • teachers in NASCAR style uniforms (hello Ricky Bobby!) or...
    • occasional audio ads - mid mini-lesson the teacher pauses and gives McGraw Hill a shout-out
  • two parent conferences a year during "Parent-Teacher Conferences" calendar days
    • no additional face-to-face opportunities
  • unlimited calls from teacher to parent
  • no calls permitted from parent to teacher


Premium public education - $9.99 per month

  • ad free
  • two parent conferences a year during "Parent-Teacher Conferences" calendar days
    • up to 2 additional face-to-face conferences per year
  • unlimited calls from teacher to parent
  • 10 calls permitted per school year from parent to teacher


Platinum public education - $19.99 per month

  • ad free
  • two parent conferences a year during "Parent-Teacher Conferences" calendar days
    • up 5 additional face-to-face conferences per year
  • unlimited calls from teacher to parent
  • unlimited calls permitted per school year from parent to teacher

A nifty one page handout of the fantastic subscription options!


Of course bulk discounts would be available so an entire class of parents can get together to ensure all students in the room are covered under the same plan. An Educators plan is possible too, for those teachers who are also parents of public school children, possibly free but will depend on the success of the other pricing structures.

Think Spotify, Pandora, or Office365 but applied to public education.

Teachers split the revenue with the school on a 50/50 scale, similar to the way Apple handles profits with app developers. Teachers are providing the service, but the school is providing the avenue for distribution, therefore profits will be split (and in the spirit of fairness, 50/50 seems reasonable).


But of course...
... teachers will still get their base salary as per contracts with local municipalities. And yes, residents still have to pay taxes to support free public education. But with this new, fantastic, tiered subscription model...




</snark>
Yes, this post has it's tongue firmly planted within it's cheek...

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